Routes

From 1921 to 1938 all the British attempts to climb Mount Everest were made via the North Col – North East Ridge route from Tibet. After the Second World War all routes to Mount Everest were forbidden and closed. In 1951 China occupied Tibet, the Chinese stopped all foreign travellers from gaining access to Mount Everest from the traditional route. The British turned their sights to the South side in Nepal. Permission was granted, which eventually led to the successful 1953 expedition. Today, you can reach Mount Everest from both Tibet and Nepal. Both countries welcome climbers and visitors from all over the world.

The two normal routes to climb Mount Everest are the South Col – South East Ridge from Nepal and the North Col – North East Ridge from Tibet.

There are other routes that will get you to the summit of Everest, although these are not very often used now a days.

Other routes that have been climbed although not very often include:

West Ridge Hornbein Couloir, South West Face, West Ridge Direct, Japanese Couloir, South Pillar, South West Pillar, North East Ridge – North Face – Norton Couloir 1, North East Ridge – North Face – Norton Couloir 2, East Face American Butress, The Great Couloir, East Face – South Col, Below North Col – North Face – Norton Couloir, The Complete North East Ridge, North – North East Direct, Central North Face Direct.

The diagram below shows most of the routes that have been climbed or attempted.

Mount Everest Routes

Diagram © Pete Poston www.wou.edu/las/physci/poston/everest

Take a look at the route details for:

South Col – South East Ridge

North Col – North East Ridge