Hallucinations on Mount Everest

At 28,000 feet up and counting – it was almost the end of the climb for Frank Smythe. With all his fellow mountaineers breezed away by the mystic Mount Everest, Smythe had nobody to rely on except himself, or so he thought.

One day in June 1933, while Frank Smythe was only a few thousand feet away from the summit, some unknown force that he never thought existed interrupted him. Frank has high regard for the scientific advancement of his profession and passion, and never did he ever imagine that he would come into close encounter with someone of the third kind.

The first sighting was with an invisible companion. In Frank’s most desperate moment of getting only the thinnest of the oxygen in his current altitude, he felt a strong presence of someone who can throw a rope right away if he slips off the cliff. Sensing a feeling of relief, Frank took a Kendal mint off his pocket, and thought that he ought to share half of it with his invisible companion.

The second encounter was nothing like the first one. The latter proved to be a friendlier meeting with the third kind, while this one appeared to be a cold, nonchalant apparition from an unseen force in the sky. Again, Frank felt a strong presence enveloping his vision, and this time he had to make mental tests just so he could trust his own eyes. It was clear that he believed that he must have been hallucinating at that moment, and no such strange things are hovering around the sky. Almost halfway to the roof of the Earth, Frank reached for the names of the famous mountains from the back of his mind, and pointed as to which direction they are located right from where he is standing. Without a second thought, he looked back to where he first saw the two strange objects, and they were still there, inanimate and distant unlike the first encounter.

Frank survived another near-death experience and returned to the camp while the team anticipated for a detailed recap of his adventures and experiences in the climb. However, Frank was hesitant to tell everything that happened. He never dared to recount the whole story of the strange encounters. It was only after the team leader convinced him that it was worth the thrill and miracle to share how he endured the most dangerous moments in his career.

Climbing Mount Everest was a futile attempt only until 1980 when advanced tools were developed, and this was 50 decades after Smythe climbed his way to his life’s summit. If so, his chances of surviving the cold and uncharted climbing track were thinner than the air at that altitude. How then, did he manage to get out of it alive?

What Frank had seen could merely be a creative product of man’s imagination, or could it be that the Third Factor, as they call it, has really worked its way to rescue lives through a phenomenal intervention? After all, what people perceived to be hallucinations could actually be a mystery beyond science, waiting to be grasped by the human brain.